England football managers

Football managers do much more than just wave their hands on the sidelines. These men are exceptional leaders and know their game like the back of their hand. Football managers of national teams, clubs, etc. plot their games in great detail and are always directing their teams what to do next as the match progresses from one stage to another. This article will share some really helpful information on some of the past as well as the present England football managers and coaches, their strategies, their playing styles, and their accomplishments. This information should help all the football bettors reading this article.

Alf Ramsey – one of the greatest

Ramsey served as England’s coach between 1963 and 1974 and is considered the greatest manager that the team has seen. He led England to victory on home soil in the 1966 World Cup. Ramsey, unfortunately, couldn’t continue on the job after 1974 when he failed to secure a berth for his ‘wingless wonders’ in the 1978 World Cup. Ramsey is considered the greatest football coach of England also because he unlocked the talents of many of English players. He had had a deep pool to choose from such as Bobby Charlton, Bobby Moore, and Gordon Banks.

Bobby Robson – rekindling England’s interest in football

Robson was the England football manager between 1982 and 1990. Twinkly-eyed and having a great sense of humour, Robson rekindled England’s interest in this sport after he took the team to the semis in the 1990 World Cup. Unfortunately. the Englishmen lost to the Germans in the penalty shootout. Robson had had his lows prior to the ’90 World Cup. His team had lost to Argentina in 1986 World Cup and the campaign in the 1988 Euro Cup was also a disaster. Robson is known for his excellent management skills and his terrific chemistry with Lineker, Gascoigne, and Terry Butcher.

Gareth Southgate – reviving England’s football

Southgate picked up from where Robson had left. He left the football world agape when his team crashed into the 2018 World Cup semis. This win was even more pleasurable because it happened on foreign soil. What makes Southgate’s role remarkable in that campaign was that his team played without any pressure and the fans cheered his mean all until the semis. Though England lost to Croatia in the extra-time, that match pitchforked Southgate to all-time greatness. Southgate retired as a footballer in 2006 at the age of 35 but stuck with the game as the manager of Middlesborough.

Terry Venables – an excellent communicator

Venables was the England football coach between 1994 and 1996. An excellent communicator and man manager, he used the 1996 Euro Cup campaign to fine-tune his Christmas Tree strategy. With Alan Shearer as the pivot, this team demolished Holland 4-1 and Scotland by a single goal by Paul Gascoigne. The Englishmen were lucky to wade past the Spaniards in the quarters but ultimately had to submit to the Germans in the semis on penalty shootouts. Besides being the manager of the English football team, Venables has served as the manager of Leeds, Middlesborough, Spurs, F.C Barcelona and Australia.

Sven Goran Ericsson – a mild-mannered winner

Ericsson is arguably considered one of the best England football managers. He was the first foreign manager of this team and acquitted himself well. A mild-mannered man, Erickson navigated England past Germany to a World Cup quarter-final slot. The English had won that match 5-1 against a greatly weakened German side. However, many critics say that Erickson could not leverage the potential of his players. The maximum that he could do was that quarter-final place. Besides managing England, Erickson has also coached the national teams of Philippines, Mexico, and Ivory Coast. He has also won 18 trophies in his career as a manager.

Glen Hoddle and Roy Hodgson – controversial new style

Glen Hoddle is considered as one of the best England coaches for taking the team to the Rome World Cup. He served as the England coach between 1996 and 1999 and is still remembered for his management skills at Le Tournoi. He had an attacking and passing style but his critics still don’t forgive him for not playing Michael Owens in the first two 1998 World Cup matches. This lapse becomes even more glaring given that Owens was very much a part of the squad that held Argentina to a 2-2 draw in the same World Cup.

Hodge lasted from 2012 until 2016 and brought in a new management style to English football. He had a marvellous run-in in three major football tournaments; his team won 16 matches and drew 4 times. Hodge couldn’t keep up the tempo in all these 3 tournaments. In 2012, England topped its group after a great 3-2 win over Sweden but in the 2014 World Cup, the team crashed out just after a couple of matches. The 2016 Euro campaign didn’t pan out better for England. In that match, his team went down quietly against unfancied England.